education news via twitter

There IS Hope for Learning - IF We Investigate, Optimize, Protect and Invent

As we experience the digital transformation, it is hard to tell which efforts will last, what the impact will be on students who start playing with/learning through digital media at 3 years old or soon thereafter.

What happens to brains when youths take in a large part of their information from electronic sources rather than nature and in person experiences?

How much more information are youths able to access in this new world?

How will youths integrate knowledge they obtain?

Who will help youths (and all) to learn how to determine if information received online is valid?

What will the physical, emotional, intellectual, motivational, and real world career readiness effects be?

A few projects dealing with these issues are:

Smithsonian's New Learning Lab--they will focus on learning how people are learning from their collections and resources.

AwesomeStories--(which I have been working with for several years,) has launched "MakerSpace for the Humanities" enabling learners of all ages and teachers of all levels to engage in research and creation of new knowledge work-- stories, papers, lessons-- even e-books and whole year curricula. MakerSpace for the Humanities provides ways for learners to engage in the stories of humanity, learn actively and authentically, preparing for work and lives in the digital age.

Edutopia--continues to research and profile important strides in humanizing learning in the digital age through service learning, project-based learning, social and emotional learning and more.

Collective Shift-- has been announced by the MacArthur Foundation. They are devoting $25million to "a new nonprofit whose mission is to redesign social systems for the connected age. With $25 million in seed funding, Collective Shift’s first project is LRNG, which is creating a 21st century ecosystem of learning that combines in-school, out-of-school, work-based, and online learning opportunities that are visible and accessible to all." -


Valid yet: Bertrand Russell's 10 Commandments of Teaching and Learning-

The Ten Commandments that, as a teacher, I should wish to promulgate, might be set forth as follows:

  1. Do not feel absolutely certain of anything.
  2. Do not think it worth while to proceed by concealing evidence, for the evidence is sure to come to light.
  3. Never try to discourage thinking for you are sure to succeed.
  4. When you meet with opposition, even if it should be from your husband or your children, endeavor to overcome it by argument and not by authority, for a victory dependent upon authority is unreal and illusory.
  5. Have no respect for the authority of others, for there are always contrary authorities to be found.
  6. Do not use power to suppress opinions you think pernicious, for if you do the opinions will suppress you.
  7. Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.
  8. Find more pleasure in intelligent dissent than in passive agreement, for, if you value intelligence as you should, the former implies a deeper agreement than the latter.
  9. Be scrupulously truthful, even if the truth is inconvenient, for it is more inconvenient when you try to conceal it.
  10. Do not feel envious of the happiness of those who live in a fool’s paradise, for only a fool will think that it is happiness.